• Housing Policy Imperatives

Showing Trinidad and Tobago A New Way HomeDecent and affordable housing remains one of the key ingredients of developing a better quality of life for our people.  The present national housing policy was published in September 2002 and promised a large-scale programme for construction of new homes for sale.  The original target of 100,000 new homes in a decade has never been achieved and the programme was beset with widespread allegations of corruption.  The Uff Commission reported in March 2010 and made many critical findings on this programme.  In addition, some may say consequently, since 25th May 2010 we have a newly-elected government and the moment is now ripe for these failed policies to be re-considered.

It is my plain view that the existing housing policy is a serious failure.  This series sets out to identify the areas of failure and sets out my proposals for a new approach to an equitable and redistributive national housing policy.

  • Persons wishing to read the existing housing policy—Showing Trinidad and Tobago a New Way HOME—cited in these articles may read it or download it here.
Date of Publication Title Abstract
22th June,2010 Housing policy imperatives – part 1 Proper housing is an essential part of decent human rights and the development of a just society. For those of us who have proper housing, we can be virtually blind to the plight of those who do not.
28th June, 2010 Housing policy imperatives – part 2 Last week’s column set out my principal queries as to our nation’s housing policy and the intervening events have only put those into better focus.
6th July,2010 Housing policy imperatives – part 3 This week, I will set out some suggestions as to how this wrong-headed allocation of public subsidy might be re-oriented to better serve our needy citizens.
19th July, 2010 Housing policy imperatives – part 4 In this week’s column, I will further analyse the existing housing policy so as to highlight those errors which we must avoid if we are to do better.
5th August,2010 Housing policy imperatives – part 5 This week the examination shifts to the scale of the failure of our national housing policy
30th August, 2010 Housing policy imperatives – part 6 I am bringing this analysis to a close by asking the question as to which individuals are ultimately responsible for this scandalous situation.
  1. #1 by mhuggins on July 22, 2010 - 3:04 pm

    Somehow, this phrase sits with me: “we have a newly-elected government and the moment is now ripe for these failed policies to be re-considered.” as a premise, presumption and presupposition…I wonder if it will be dealt with at all. Is it accurate to expect a reconsideration from this new administration, on what basis, to what effect, to what change and difference?
    What is expected? I await to see if that as a sub-topic will be wrangled with through the series.

    • #2 by AfraRaymond on July 22, 2010 - 3:19 pm

      Yes, Melise,

      That is the very point I have been grappling with in the parallel three-parter ‘Change, not Exchange’ – also accessible on this blog.

      Are we going to have a continuation of old policies and outlooks or is there a real change in the administration of our country.

      The very first point on the Housing Policy which I tackled is the basic outlook – i.e. does HDC facilitate by providing a housing opportunity as with the serviced lots done by the UNC, or do they get further involved in extensive building of communities as under the present policy.

      Thanks for your comments.

      Afra

  2. #3 by mhuggins on July 23, 2010 - 7:46 pm

    Not in response to anything but my own comments on Food Security versus Housing Provision; Land Use and Appropriate Allocation, I offer John Spence’s column

    http://www.trinidadexpress.com/commentaries/99083764.html

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